309K: Turn back to the front and read it again!

I grew up in the mountains of Virginia.  In my three room country school, there were very few books, but there is one I remember very fondly and would love to have a copy of it.   I don’t remember the title or author, but I would have read this around 1946 or 1947.   Here is a gist of the story.  A family lives very happily in a tiny, tidy one room house.  One day they decide that their house is too small so they begin adding rooms onto the one room.  They continue to add so many rooms (one behind the other) that they seldom see their family members.  I believe that the house became such a curiosity that train tracks were built along side the house so tourists could see it.   The family members navigated this long house on roller skates.  One day the family happened to meet together in one of the many rooms and decided that they were much happier in their one room.  So they proceeded to tear down all of the added rooms until their house was back to the one room.  Here is the part that intrigued me and the reason I believe I still remember it.  On the final page, it said.  “If you want to see what this family did next, turn back to the front of the book and read it again!”

308O: A shy lighthouse keeper

I have a library customer searching for a children’s book, but she doesn’t remember the title or plot. She thinks the author’s last name was Harper. It was a hardback picture book about a lighthouse keeper who was a shy man. The cover illustration was of a man in a long yellow rain slicker with a yellow rain hat over his face. It was published around 1948 or so. She said that her grandfather, Alonzo Washington, worked for a family called Harper who ran a publishing business in the Greater Philadelphia (Chester County) area, and one of the family members wrote this book for her when she was a child. She’s positive it was actually published, not a one-off. Her name is Marcilene Brown, if that will help at all. I haven’t been able to find any ties between her “Harper family” and the NYC Harper publishers. I hope you can help solve this mystery! Thank you very much for your help.

 

 

307D: A Poor Mountain Family

I’m looking for a book that was probably published in the 1940s. It had the bluish grey print that I understand was used during WWII. Seems to me it was about a poor mountain family (maybe Appalachia) with, I believe, 12 or 13 kids and all of them had a pet except for the youngest. It was about that child’s wish for his or her own pet. Anybody remember that?


 

305W: A Family Moves to the Country

When I was in grade school in the late 1950's, I read a book, possibly from the library Bookmobile, that was about a family who moved to the country. The main theme was the transition to an old, broken-down house and the arduous process of fixing it up to make it livable. The story is told, I believe, by a young son, probably about the age I was when I read (10 or 11) it. What started out as an unpleasant experience for the kids, at least, over time turned into an adventure as the DIY project progressed and the boy explored the surrounding area. Finally, the family was able to embrace the house as their new home and I think the son learned the value or hard work and the pride that comes from it. I know this is sketchy at best, but it's not easy to clean out the cobwebs of my memory that far back! Any help would be greatly appreciated.

305S: Enchanted dog and cat

 

Anyway the book I am looking for was a collection of children’s stories, possibly different authors and I think English and 1940s 1950s.

One story is about two children who help a dog and cat who have been enchanted and are the figureheads on a boat they find when the meadow at the end of their garden turns into a magical lake.

 

Hope you can help :0