362A: Monkey eating crackers

I have very little to go on. I remember this book so fondly from my childhood. I would guess from middle school years. I remember just laughing and laughing about a passage from it while reading on a plane ride to England.
A young girl has a pet male monkey who is hidden in her bag or piece of luggage perhaps on an airplane or maybe a train. The monkey is eating some crackers I think and starts sort of spitting them. The description of it just had me laughing out loud. Sort of the words to describe the sound of it. Maybe ‘pffft’, no that is not right.
The girl may have been the daughter of a diplomat? I think the monkey may have snuck into her luggage and she hears him eating the crackers. I think bits of crackers come out of the piece of luggage as she opens it. I’m not sure though.
I do not know if the book was American or English. It had a mostly purple cover 🙄 and was hardback.
I know that is a minuscule amount of information to give you. Oh, I would have been in 8th grade in 1982 but moved to England after finishing 7th grade. I think it was a fairly newly written book.
I have always hoped that I would be able to remember more and be able to find it. I cannot for the life of me remember the name of the monkey or any of the other characters.

361G: YA historical novel heroine Margaret Plantagenet of York, later Margaret Pole

Young Adult historical novel about the childhood/teenage years of Margaret Plantagenet of York, who later became Margaret Pole, and her brother Ned (Edward, Duke of Warwick), at the end of the War of the Roses and beginning of the Tudor period.  It starts in the court of her uncle, Edward IV, after her father (George, Duke of Clarence) has been executed for treason, and ends with her brother’s execution and her romance with Reginald Pole.  My memory is that the heroine is known as Meggy or Peggy. I probably read this in the early 60s, but it might have been written in the 30s, 40s or 50s. I thought the author might be Elizabeth Janet Gray, Rosemary Sutcliffe, Margaret C. Leighton, or Elizabeth George Speare but can’t find anything that seems to match this story among their titles.

359R: Evil Ghost Tries to Bring Orphan Girl into her World (Solved!)

Looking for a book where an orphaned young girl goes to live with her cousins – I think there were four cousins – two boys and two girls. I think the story was set in England because I remember a scene where the group goes out for fish and chips. The orphan is having a hard time adjusting and becomes friendly with a ghost who is haunting the house. The ghost – also a young girl – is trying to get the orphan to come into her world by dying. The orphan is eventually rescued from the evil ghost by her cousins

358E: All About the World War

I recall there was a book I read when I believe I was about 8 or 9 years old which I really enjoyed but forgot the name. It was about a World War (can’t remember if it was the first or second) and it was made in a way (cover, text) which was mainly for children/young adults but was also suitable for adults. I remember the cover of the book looking somewhat childish – a yellow cover or something?
Also, the author’s name was mentioned right before the book title which was something like, ‘All about the War’. So for example, if the author’s name was John Smith, it would be, ‘John Smith’s All About The War’ book, if that makes sense. I also believe the author was British/English.
There is also one page which I very clearly remember. There was an image of a man and a woman wearing military dress and the text next to it was written by the author and said, ‘this was my mother and father during the war (again, unsure which one the book was about) who served in the RAF.

356P: Trying to find a novel set in England during World War II (Solved!)

I have no idea what the title of the book is. The copy I read was a paperback, probably published in the 1970s; I’m thinking it may have been a gothic romance or something of the sort.
What I can remember of the characters:
-Yseult, no idea what her last name was. She loses her memory after being in a bar? cafe? restaurant? in London that gets hit by the Blitz, wakes up in the hospital, sees herself in a mirror and finds out she’s pretty; she can’t remember her name but tells the nurse her name is “Lake”. She goes back to the place where she was when the bomb hit and starts talking to a man there.
-Nicholas Chammerd (possibly “Chamerd”) is the man she talks to; he was there the night of the bombing and had noticed but not spoken to her . They end up moving in together, and getting married. He is in the RAF? Army? some military thing, and goes off and gets killed.
Then she finds out she’s pregnant. She’s coming back to what was their flat one evening, hears a limping set of footsteps behind her, and faints.
-Lake, no idea what his full name was. And “Lake” turned out to be just a nickname, which she’d given him when they were children (or possibly she was a child and he already an adult). Turns out, he’s her first and legitimate husband, who she ran away from the night of the Blitz attack on whatever place she was in on her first night in London. He sees she’s pregnant and, although he knows he can’t be the father, says he’ll bring up the baby as his and brings her back home.
-Leda, Yseult’s stepmother, lives at Lake’s home. She previously tried to seduce him, but he wasn’t interested, so she decided to ruin his life with Yseult. Earlier in their lives together she’d convinced Yseult, who seems to have been a real dope before she met Nicholas and grew up a bit, that it would be funny to string something across the country lane where Lake was riding his horse. He was injured, hence the limping thereafter; I think the horse had to be destroyed too. And Yseult believed it when Leda tells her that Leda previously had an affair with Lake, which is why Yseult runs away.
Other things I remember:
It’s obvious Leda is the bad guy even before Yseult remembers her earlier life, as when she returns there is rationing going on, but somehow Leda always manages to have an elaborate tea, including real butter and eggs in the food. They’re on a farm, or in the countryside anyhow, but most of what’s produced is supposed to go to feed the troops.
Speaking of the troops, I think Nicholas was in the RAF as there’s an airfield nearby and Leda, who likes to surround herself with young men, wants to invite some to tea, and Yseult is afraid someone will recognize her and call her “Mrs. Chammerd”.
There’s a Blitz attack on their home, which leads to Yseult regaining her memory, and during which Leda is killed. Yseult is full of remorse when she realizes how badly she treated Lake at Leda’s instigation earlier on in their lives, and also realizes that she’s always loved him. She also says something about how good it was that Leda died while she was still relatively young and pretty.
It’s also possible the baby is born somewhere along the way – I vaguely recall a discussion about red hair, and how Lake when he was young was redheaded so everyone believes it’s really his baby. Yseult, when she sees herself in the mirror in the hospital, notes that she’s darkhaired; I’m pretty sure Nicholas had red hair.

353V: Orphan Cathy Runs Away to Scotland and Learns True Name (Solved!)

I’m looking for a British children’s book, likely from the late 1940s, about an orphan girl who lost her parents in the Blitz. She’s found wandering London with a torn tag that says only “Cat” so the orphanage calls her Cathy. Several years later she has a sudden recollection that makes her feel that her family is in Scotland and runs away to find them. Meets some siblings who help her and have a kind uncle named Alastair. Lo and behold, the kids end up being her cousins, her name isn’t Cathy, it’s Catriona(?) and she is reunited with the family who have been searching for her all these years. Might be the first in a series, a la the Boxcar Children. Thank you!

347Y: Galoshes Raincoat Boy

A picture of my grandson reminded both me and my son of a book (two books at least in the series) by an English author that centered on a young boy who lived in the city with his mother. We both have vivid memories of him in his raincoat and putting on his galoshes. Everything about the book was quintessentially English – sort of Paddington mood. The boy lived in an urban setting, maybe working to middle class (not as posh as Paddington’s digs). The stories were about routine things – doing errands, the mail, etc. It’s driving us both crazy!